Street Address
248 Oakland Avenue, SE
Atlanta, GA 30312
Mailing Address
248 Oakland Avenue, SE
Atlanta, GA 30312
phone: 404-688-2107
fax: 404-658-6092
e-mail: dmoore@oaklandcemetery.com
web: www.oaklandcemetery.com
Admissions
Free, Tour Charge
Staff
David S. Moore, Executive Director

Description

Historic Oakland Foundation (HOF), a non-profit organization, was established in 1976 and is dedicated to the preservation, restoration and interpretation of Oakland. The Foundation works specifically to increase the awareness of Oakland as an historical attraction of estimable value to the city. As well as our work in the important area of preservation, members enjoy field trips, participating in various on-going projects, gardening, guided tours and helping with the many festive functions that Historic Oakland Foundation sponsors. Become a part of the success story of Historic Oakland today. Join Historic Oakland Foundation members, who are dedicated to the restoration and preservation of this historic treasure. Oakland Cemetery is owned by the City of Atlanta as a public park and active burial ground. The year 1976 marks the date that Oakland was placed on the National Register of Historic Places, hence Historic Oakland Cemetery. This date also is the year that The Historic Oakland Foundation was developed as a supportive friends group of the cemetery.

Mission

The Historic Oakland Foundation's mission is to raise money for restoration and preservation of Oakland Cemetery.

History

To understand how Atlanta evolved, one must come to Oakland. A stroll through the cemetery reveals how Oakland is linked with all that Atlanta has been. Oakland is a hallowed yet inviting green space where daily life blends with history and art as a matter of course. Established in 1850, Oakland’s 88 acres is an outstanding expression of the “rural garden” cemetery of the Victorian era. A century and a half later, Oakland conveys the essence of these cemeteries; winding paths, shade trees and picturesque vistas that evoke English gardens of the 18th century. America’s public park movement took inspiration from rural garden cemeteries like Oakland. The cemetery’s prominence in this genre caused it to be listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976.