Street Address
Dallas Holocaust Museum
211 N. Record St.
Dallas, TX 75202
Mailing Address
211 N. Record St.
Dallas, TX 75202
phone: 214-741-7500
fax: 214-747-2270
e-mail: info@dallasholocaustmuseum.org
web: www.dallasholocaustmuseum.org
Admissions
Adults - $6
Students - $4
Seniors (over 55) - $4
Active Military -$4
Groups of 15 or more $4 per person
Museum Type(s)
Staff
Carol Barber, Director of Development
phone: 214-741-7500 x103
Cathey Treider, Director of Operations
phone: 214-741-7500 x108
Kathy Chapman, Director of Education and Programming
phone: 214-741-7500 x104
Marsha Friedman, Operations Admin. Assist.
phone: 214-741-7500 x105
Stan Friedman, Administrative Assistant
phone: 214-741-7500 x100
Hope Levine, Visitor & Volunteer Coordinator
phone: 214-741-7500 x106
Leslie Wagner, Archivist
phone: 214-741-7500 x107
Chris Kelley, Pubilc Relations

Description

The Dallas Holocaust Museum, Center for Education and Tolerance, is a non-profit organization dedicated to teaching the lessons of the Holocaust and memorializing its victims. It provides guided tours for groups, public lectures and exhibits, and other programming. The Museum has a collection of audiovisual materials including videotapes, slides, and microfiche. It also serves as a coordinator for videotaping testimonies of Holocaust survivors experiences as well as liberators of the concentration camps. The Museum stands as a memorial dedicated to the six million Jews murdered during the Holocaust and a place of tribute to those non-Jewish people who saved the honor of mankind with their praiseworthy acts of rescue.
It is our hope that all those who enter the Museum will study, understand, and remember that the choices each of us makes in his or her daily life affect the world and its destiny. Our mission is to reduce prejudice in today s society by teaching about the experience of the Jews during the Holocaust.

History

In 1977, approximately 200 Jewish Holocaust Survivors joined together and formed an organization called Holocaust Survivors in Dallas. Their unique experience of rebuilding their lives after surviving the terror of the Holocaust gave them the fortitude and background needed to provide a means to educate the public at large about such a devastating event. They also wanted to memorialize their loved ones and the other victims of the Holocaust. The result of their efforts is the Dallas Memorial Center for Holocaust Studies, which opened in 1984. In January 2005, the Memorial Center changed its name to the Dallas Holocaust Museum, Center for Education and Tolerance, and moved to its present, temporary location in downtown Dallas. Plans have been made for its permanent location in the historic West End area of downtown Dallas.
The major feature of the Dallas Holocaust Museum is the display of photographs and artifacts from the Holocaust and the era preceding it when Jewish life and culture in Europe flourished. A prized element of the museum is an actual boxcar used to transport Jews to ghettos and death camps.
An entire room is designed as a memorial. It includes a large memorial stone surrounded by pillars labeled with names of concentration camps and linked by barbed wire chains. Plaques on the walls list the names of lost relatives of Dallas Survivors, and on a special wall, the names of Righteous Gentiles who aided Jews during the Holocaust.
The Museum serves as an archive for Holocaust-related materials. The library includes over 2,500 books and periodicals on the Holocaust.
The Dallas Holocaust Museum has made a major contribution to the preservation of history through its videotaped testimony project. The Museum has coordinated the videotaping of over one hundred interviews with Holocaust Survivors and American soldiers who participated in liberating the camps. The Museum maintains an audiovisual materials collection which includes videotapes of documentary films on the Holocaust as well as slide programs, posters, audiotapes, and other educational material.
The Museum is always in the process of developing new programs and expanding its current ones to better accomplish its mission of reducing prejudice against all minorities in American society.

Artifacts Collections

Holocaust artifacts and photographs.

Research Collections

Holocaust artifacts and photographs.

Educational Programs

Educational offerings include field trip to the Holocaust Center, outreach by Holocaust Survivors speaking on-site to classes, library, teacher in-service workshop provided on-site, lectures, and exhibits.

Curriculum guides for teaching the Holocaust, audiovisual materials from the Lending Library, a comprehensive historical survey booklet entitled "An Overview of the Holocaust" including suggested books and videos are all considered general enough for usage by other institutions. Price list is available. Some programs are free.

    Publications

    Newsletter, three times a year; booklet - "An Overview of the Holocaust," audiovisual materials catalogue.