Street Address
632 Washington Street
Cumberland, MD 21502
Mailing Address
632 Washington Street
Cumberland, MD 21502
phone: 301-777-7782
e-mail: info@thewhitinghouse.org
web: www.thewhitinghouse.org/
Hours
May through October
The Museum will be open this year on the second and fourth Saturdays of the month with tours at 1,2, & 3PM and by appointment.
Staff
Sharon Nealis, Executive Director

Description

The F. Brooke Whiting House & Museum is a 1911 bungalow of stucco plaster that is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. George Sansbury, a notable Cumberland architect, designed the boyhood home of F. Brooke Whiting. The home is furnished with family antiques, eclectic collections, and a vast library.

Brooke Whiting amassed his collection of art from world traveling, worldwide associations with prestigious antique dealers and auction houses, and through inheritance from his sister Anne Whiting, his life partner Wesley Griswold, and his parents Brooke and Ruth Whiting.

Brooke Whiting's personal library of over 1500 volumes, ancestral documents from the eighteenth century onward, and various photographic materials and ephemera from his travels.

History

Brooke Whiting was born on December 5, 1918 to F. Brooke I and Ruth White Whiting of 632 Washington Street, Cumberland, Maryland. His father was a prominent attorney in Cumberland; his mother was the daughter of Warren C. White, a former mayor of Cumberland and founder of the German Brewing Company. Brooke II had an older sister, Anne Frances, born in 1913; she had a distinguished career with the C.I.A.

Brooke's desire to preserve Cumberland's history and traditions via contributions to the Historical Society extended beyond his membership dues and donating some of his parents antique furnishings. He deeply wished to provide the community with remnants of his rich heritage and the exquisite and historically valuable collections amassed in his lifetime from world traveling, worldwide associations with prestigious antique dealers and auction houses, and inheritance from his life-partner Wesley S. Griswold. Thus, upon his death in 1998, he bequeathed his Cumberland house and its contents to the Society on the condition that his home be opened as a museum.