Street Address
5608 10th Avenue
Kenosha, WI 53140
Mailing Address
5608 10th Avenue
Kenosha, WI 53140
phone: 262-653-4450
fax: 262-653-4446
web: www.dinosaurdiscoverymuseum.org
Hours
Mondayclosed
Sunday, Tuesday - Saturday12 PM - 5 PM
Closed holiday
Admissions
Free Admission and Hop Kenosha’s electric streetcar (Adults $1, Kids $.50) and visit the main museum campus on Lake Michigan’s shore and visit the Kenosha Public Museum an accredited natural science and fine arts museum and the Civil War!
Staff
Chris DeSantis, Education Curator
phone: 262-653-4450
Dan Joyce, Senior Curator
phone: 262-653-4140
Peggy Gregorski, Development Coordinator

Description

The Dinosaur Discovery Museum in Kenosha, Wisconsin is the only museum to exclusively focus on the link between birds and meat-eating dinosaurs, one of the most complete known fossil records. In association with the Carthage Institute of Paleontology (CIP) and the Institute’s on-site laboratory, the Museum presents current, ongoing research in the study of dinosaurs. The Museum collaborates with the CIP in research, field work, and education programs. This includes the collection and preservation of dinosaur specimens for its research collections. The main gallery of the Dinosaur Discovery Museum tells the story of how non-avian, theropod dinosaurs like Tyrannosaurus rex and Allosaurus gave rise to the avian dinosaurs - the birds. This is one of the most complete transitions known from the fossil record and can be seen in action in the Museum. The gallery is a primer on dinosaurs – what they were, how we know they existed, what they looked like, how they behaved, how and why they were alike and different, and what happened to them. The dinosaur skeletons in the main gallery are casts of actual dinosaur fossil bones. The lighter bones are casts of actual fossil bones. The black bones show those missing from the original skeletons but sculpted to replace them. Each dinosaur is labeled with information about the species. Panels on the gallery wall answer the most-asked questions about dinosaurs. You can listen to the environmental and animal sounds in the exhibit gallery. Step back into the Mesozoic era with outdoors sounds in different terrains and weather conditions during the Age of Dinosaurs.

In association with the Carthage Institute of Paleontology and the Institute’s on-site laboratory, the Museum presents current, ongoing research in the study of dinosaurs. The Museum collaborates with the Carthage Institute of Paleontology in research, field work, and education programs. This includes the collection and preservation of dinosaur specimens for its research collections. Activities are offered at the Dinosaur Discovery Museum and the Kenosha Public Museum on Sunday Fundays. These are free, drop-in programs for adults with children. Sponsored by the Friends of the Museums. Join us on select Wednesday evenings for Dinosaur Discussions, a series of lectures great for the whole family. Whether you’re an amateur paleontologist or have a budding one at home, these talks are sure to excite the imagination. The Museum offers hands-on learning and fun at Dino Digs every Saturday and Sunday from 1-4pm. Come and get your hands dirty! Dino Digs are for children ages three and up. Donning safety goggles and using paleontologist tools, children become amateur paleontologists and dig for dinosaurs at our simulated excavation sites. Experience the excitement of excavating a dinosaur fossil. Free!

Learn about the evolution of meat-eating dinosaurs to birds in this new museum! See skeletons from the size of a chicken to T=rex - all for free! pinemanor401.com

History

The accredited Dinosaur Discovery Museum opened in August, 2006 in a renovated 1908 Beaux Arts historic landmark in the heart of beautiful Downtown Kenosha, Wisconsin.

Artifacts Collections

Paleontological specimens of meat-eating dinosaurs that are scientifically excavated by the Cathage Insitute of Paleontology.

Research Collections

Meat- eating dinosaurs.

Educational Programs

Educational programs for people of all ages.