Street Address
200 W. Hill Ave.
Knoxville, TN 37901
Mailing Address
Post Office Box 1703
Knoxville, TN 37901
phone: 865-525-2375
e-mail: info@blountmansion.org
web: www.blountmansion.org
Hours
Tuesday-Sat. 10-5; Sunday 1-
Admissions
Adults $7; Seniors/ AAA/ CAA $6; Students (6-17) $5; Under 6 Free Group & Motorcoach discounts are available with a minimum of 20 and advance reservations.
Services
Gift Shop
Staff
Mr. Jason Illari, Director
Ashleigh Oatts, Education Coordinator

Description

Nestled in the center of Downtown Knoxville's government district, Blount Mansion offers history that is hard to miss. Here, among the towers of glass, steel and brick, sits a house - small by today's standards, but a mansion on the Tennessee frontier. Known by the Cherokee Indians as "the house with many eyes," Blount Mansion has watched American history parade through its rooms and on the streets outside. Step inside and share America's big stories with us.

Mission

The Mansion was restored and opened for tours in 1930, the same year the last loan of the $31,500 purchase price was paid in full. Now, Blount Mansion, designated as Knoxville's only National Historic Landmark by the National Park Service in 1965, has become the oldest museum in Knox County.

History

By 1925, the area around the Blount Mansion had been allowed to seriously deteriorate. Slums existed in the waterfront area. Blount Mansion was in seriously run-down condition. Across the street from the Mansion site, the Andrew Johnson Hotel was under construction as part of a downtown revitalization. Efforts were underway to purchase the Blount Mansion property, and raze the only home of a signer of the U.S. Constitution outside of the 13 original states for hotel parking. Local figures such as Mrs. B.B. Cates, Dr. James Hoskins, a Dean at the University of Tennessee and President of the East Tennessee Historical Society, and Miss Mary Boyce Temple, a regent of the Bonny Kate Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, spearheaded the effort to save Blount Mansion. Mary Temple gave her check for $100 to secure the option on the property in November of 1925, and on November 17, 1926, Blount Mansion Association, Inc., was established to preserve the property. Miss Temple served as the first President of the Association. The Mansion was restored and opened for tours in 1930, the same year the last loan of the $31,500 purchase price was paid in full. Now, Blount Mansion, designated as Knoxville's only National Historic Landmark by the National Park Service in 1965, has become the oldest museum in Knox County.

Educational Programs

Historic Homes of Knoxville; Sharing resources for excellence in presenting the history, heritage and culture of East TN. From a rough frontier settlement to a grand state capitol to the attractive city you see today, the history of Knoxville is a vivid tale of the trials and triumphs of a growing town and a growing nation. It's a wild and often surprising tale marvelously told by the city's most historic homes. From log cabins to frame houses to stately stone mansions, these six Knoxville landmarks invite you into the past to experience the times and events that shaped them and the families that occupied them. Each is a chapter of history unto itself. And yet, together, they exemplify and celebrate the continuing pioneering spirit that created Knoxville and our great nation. Welcome to our homes! Blount Mansion: http://www.blountmansion.org; Mabryhazen: http://www.mabryhazen.com; Crescent Bend: http://www.crescentbend.org; Ramsey House: http://www.ramseyhouse.org; Marble Springs: http://www.discoveret.org/jsma; James White's Fort: http://www.discoveret.org/jwf.

    Services

    Gift Shop